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NativeTech: Indigenous Food and Traditional Recipes
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Category : The Four Legged       Region : Southeast ~ Prairie       Rating : 1
Stomach Bread

Contributor : Added by Administrator

Tribal Affiliation : Choctaw

Orgin of Recipe : Offered by Bud Henson ... who learned this from Wilderness Survival - Brigham Young University

Type of Dish : Contemporary & Traditional

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Ingredients

  • Fresh sheep stomach(s).
  • 4 cups cornmeal (can substitute equal amount oatmeal)
  • Large boiling pot per stomach. Kettles will hold multiple.
  • 8 cups warm water
  • Bread dough - I prefer using a potato dough but the frybreads work very well also.
  • Optional: Chopped onions (2 cups)
  • The original recipe (enough for 4 - 6 stomachs) calls for:
  • 15 cups flour
  • 6 pkgs dry yeast
  • 1 cup raw sugar
  • 4 Tblsp salt

Directions

Fill pot(s) with water and set to boil.


Thoroughly clean out the stomach leaving about 2" of esophagus & intestine attached at either end of the stomach. Set aside, but keep moist.

Make your bread dough.

Tie off one end of the stomach securely as water must not get into the stomach as it cooks.

Insert the dough into the stomach. Fill the stomach about 1/2 to 3/4's full.

Burp out the excess air and tie off the other end very securely.

Let stand in warm place to rise for about 30 minutes.

Place the stomach into the pot of rapidly boiling water and cook for about 40 minutes, adding more water as necessary.

You may need to "roll" the stomach to cook both sides evenly.

The bread will expand to fill the stomach as it cooks.

When done (knowing exactly when is an art - good luck), remove from pot and place near the fire to dry out. The stomach will conform to the bread loaf.

Let stand 10 minutes then slit the stomach with a knife. Peel back the stomach & serve. Butter, honey or jam may be added but then you miss the special taste.

Note: Fresh stomachs have active digestive enzymes in the muscle. Without a fresh stomach, this just isn't the same as the enzymes "pre-digest" the bread rind into something VERY sweet and moist.

Boil the bread downwind from where you're at. It stinks something fierce but the taste is worth the effort as this is without a doubt the best bread on earth.


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If you would like to contribute your own Native American or First Nation's recipe to this database, please send it to me through an email by clicking on the 'Contact Us' link above.

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